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Two months after, Kaduna records another military aircraft crash

…. details sketchy as Nigerian Air Force spokesman, Air Commodore Edward Gabwet, yet to speak

US Military, US Air Force, Nigeria Airforce, Medical Evacuation, Nigeria

Barely two months after a Nigerian military plane crashed in Kaduna killing Nigeria’s army chief, Lt.-Gen. Ibrahim Attahiru, and 10 others including top officers, another military aircraft has reportedly crashed in Kaduna, the epicenter of terror and banditry in the North.

The plane, an Alpha jet, reportedly crashed after it left Yola, the Adamawa capital, this morning to attack bandits in Northwestern Nigeria.

There is no confirmation yet by Nigerian Air Force spokesman, Air Commodore Edward Gabwet.

A message sent to NAF Facebook account has not attracted any response.

Persecondnews recalls that on May 21, 2021, the country’s Chief of Army Staff, Gen Ibrahim Attahiru and 10 other officers, including the plane’s crew died as the plane was trying to land in bad weather, the military said.

President Muhammadu Buhari said he was “deeply saddened” by the crash.

Attahiru, 54, only took up his post in January 2021 following the sack of service chiefs.

The Nigerian Air Force said the incident happened as the plane was landing at Kaduna International Airport.

On Twitter, the president said the crash was a “mortal blow… at a time our armed forces are poised to end the security challenges facing the country”.

Friday’s crash comes three months to the day after a military aircraft crashed off the runway at the Abuja airport killing all the seven passengers on board.

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Written by Per Second News

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